Category Archives: Miscellaneous

How to Get the Most out of a Psychic Reading

– Come into the reading with a positive attitude. Even if you’re facing difficult times, the purpose of the reading is to help you find clarity to move beyond the difficulty.

– A good reader will give you guidance that will help you use your own free will to improve your life. The reading is not about “fate,” it’s about possibilities.

– It’s perfectly fine to come into a reading without a specific question. Often the best readings come when we’re simply open to whatever Spirit wants to tell us.

– Keep an open mind. It doesn’t matter if you’re skeptical about psychic readings, as long as you come in without prejudging or demanding “proof.” Just be prepared — you may get more out of the reading than you ever dreamed!

– Be prepared to hear the answer you need, even if it’s not necessarily the answer you hoped for. You can be confident that this information comes to you for your highest good.

– There’s no hard and fast rule about how often to get a reading. For some people once a month is right, while for other people it’s more like once a year. Let your instinct be your guide.

– Generally, it’s best to avoid coming to the same reader with the same question over and over again. Sometimes people do this because they secretly hope “this time the answer will be different.” An honest reader will never give a different answer just because it’s what the client wants to hear. However, if something has truly changed — especially if you’ve made positive steps to take control of the situation — this may be the perfect time to come in for a follow-up reading.

– There’s also no rule about whether it’s better to see one reader or many. It’s kind of like seeing a doctor: Often it’s best to stick with one doctor who knows you well, but at other times you may need a second opinion or a specialist.

– Different readers have different specialties. One reader may have a special interest in animal communication, another may specialize in past lives, another may have lots of experience with dream interpretation. If you have a specific need like this, Mimosa’s staff will be happy to make a recommendation.

– Sometimes a message you receive won’t make sense right away because something has come through to the reader about your future. If you’re confused about why you received a message, write it down and hold onto it. If a message about your future came through to the reader, chances are it’s important.

– One of the best things about getting a reading is that it can help you learn to use your own intuition. A good reader is always happy to help you learn to use your own skills in your everyday life.


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Metaphysical Properties of Incense

by Cathy Douglas

Incense smells good, and there’s nothing wrong with enjoying it for that reason alone. But as with crystals, incense — in all its different styles and fragrances — has metaphysical properties based on a long history of use. In fact, if you’re used to working with crystals, the nature of many incenses can to some extent be compared to the properties of specific stones: sandalwood to quartz, lavender to amethyst, rose to rose quartz, etc. Using a crystal with a complementary incense amplifies the power of both.

Most modern incenses are built around a sandalwood stick or cone, overlaid with perfumes, essential oils, resins or other sources of fragrance. (For more on the general types of incense and how they are made, please see our previous article, Incense Basics.)

As always, please remember that the healing properties of the incenses below are complementary to regular treatment, not a substitute. Use common sense and seek your doctor’s advice, especially if you are pregnant or suffer from respiratory conditions.

Common Incense Blends:

Nag champa: While there is a flowering plant called nag champa, the incense that goes by that name is actually a blend of sandalwood with floral scents that include the champa flower, ylang ylang, and others.Traditional nag champa formulations also rely on resin from the halmaddi tree (Ailanthus, or tree of heaven). It creates a soothing, relaxing mood. Uses: purification, creating sacred space, spiritual matters, meditation, enlightenment.

Aastha: Very much like Nag Champa, but a little sweeter. The name means “faith.” Uses: relaxation, meditation, religious occasions.

Aqua: A light floral scent with cyclamen and primrose. Uses: any kind of cooling, whether of temper, physical fever, or excess emotion of any kind.

Darshan: This traditional blend combines sandalwood, jasmine and vanilla. The word can mean “pilgrimage,” or may imply having a vision of a deity or holy person. Uses: concentration, freedom from negativity, reviving a tired mind or spirit.

India Temple: Since this is a brand name, the ingredients are proprietary information. The manufacturer will only say that they use “the finest fragrant woods, herbs, essential oils, and other ingredients of the highest quality,” and that it is designed to smell “just like temples in India.” Uses: connecting with Hindu traditions, ritual

Opium: This incense does not contain any parts of the opium poppy. It’s a blend formulated to resemble Yves St. Laurent’s Opium perfume, which is a blend of many typical incense ingredients, including sandalwood, cedarwood, jasmine, rose, cinnamon, and many more. Unsurprisingly, it turns out smelling somewhat like a store that sells incense. Uses: sleep, lucid dreaming, developing psychic skills, contacting deities and guides in dreams.

Plum blossom: This Japanese incense is actually a combination of floral and spicy ingredients, blended to evoke spring. As far as I’ve been able to discover, it doesn’t actually use plum. Uses: meditation, connecting with Zen Buddhist or other Japanese traditions, purity, feeling young

Individual Scents

The following are properties for single incense ingredients. Remember, though, that in in the real world most stick and cone incenses contain more than one ingredient, usually including a sandalwood base.

Amber: love, comfort, happiness, healing, past life discovery, connecting with the past

Benzoin: purification, clearing negative energy, balance, prosperity, dealing with negative emotions (especially anger, anxiety and depression), working through grief

Cedar: purification, clarity, enhancing psychic skills, love, preventing nightmares, respiratory infections *

Cedarwood: purification, protection, abundance, grounding, clarity, male virility, strength (including strength during a healing process)

Cinnamon: prosperity, success, healing (especially during winter), love and romance, amplifying the energy of spells or rituals, strength, cultivating power (especially for people who feel otherwise powerless, or as if they are in a hopeless situation)

Copal: Purification, protection, exorcism, finding true love, separating from toxic relationships

Cypress (including Hinoki): Strength, comfort, stress relief, confidence, will power, concentration

Dragon’s blood (resin from dracena plant): removing negativity, banishing unclean entities, protection (especially during magical work), enhancing power, male energies

Frankincense: Purification, consecration, meditation, resolving conflicts, speaking up for oneself or others, transforming a chaotic environment to one of peace. Often used in religious rituals, sometimes with myrrh.

Gardenia: Love, healing or maintaining good health, peace

Geranium / Rose geranium: courage, protection

Ginger: love & romance

Jasmine: attracting love or money, cultivating beauty (especially inner beauty), creativity (especially creating something that will touch other people), connecting with others emotionally, wisdom, dreaming (including prophetic dreaming)

Juniper: psychic skills, psychic protection & protection from the evil eye, breaking a string of bad luck

Lavender: relaxation & sleep, protection & purification, romance, cleansing (especially after a period of health issues), healing (especially from addictions), serenity

Lemon: healing, purification, love. An especially good scent to use during fasting.

Lemongrass: mental clarity, relief of respiratory conditions *

Lotus: peace & harmony, improving mood, concentration, focus. Very good for meditation, or to burn while studying.

Mesquite: disinfecting, digestive problems, enhancing the energy of spells or rituals

Musk: love & romance, courage, facing one’s limits (especially one’s mortality), connecting with departed loved ones

Myrrh: purification, consecration, exorcism, banishing negative influences, connecting with solar deities & powers. Traditionally burned during funerals.

Patchouli: attracting love ** & money, connecting with fae, sensuality, fertility, finding happiness

Pine: purification, banishing negative energy, removing curses, moving beyond outgrown habits and circumstances, strength & healing, finding a job

Rose: love & romance, fertility, emotional healing, enhancing beauty (including inner beauty), divination, house blessing

Sage: protection, purification, wisdom, balancing mind / body / soul, cleansing, creating & purifying sacred space.

Sandalwood: Protection, purification, sanctification, offering to any god, good luck.

Sweetgrass: Purification, space clearing, calls up beneficial spirits.

Vanilla: love & romance, decision making, study, power

Ylang ylang: Love, harmony, peace, euphoria

* If you use incense as a complementary treatment for a respiratory condition, be sure to use a very pure blend, and stop use immediately if the smoke causes any discomfort. If the condition is a serious one, consult your doctor before burning any incense.

** If you use patchouli to attract love, it might be a good idea to make sure the object of your desires doesn’t hate the stuff. Many people have a visceral, negative reaction to patchouli, in part because in the past it’s been used to mask the smell of pot or BO.

color magic correspondences for candles, crystals, etc.

Written by Mimosa
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Color Chakra Correspondences

Red

1st

Love, passion, courage, strength, success in times of conflict or danger, sexuality, vigorous health

Pink

4th

Happiness, self-love & esteem, romance, nurturing, peace, friendship, emotional healing, youth

Orange

2nd

Strength, success, attraction, good fortune, feasting & celebration, optimism, encouragement

Peach

2nd

Gentle strength & joy

Yellow

3rd

Clairvoyance, communication, air element, confidence, joy, banishing depression

Apple green

4th

Healing, new beginnings, cleansing

Green

4th

Healing, prosperity, growth, nature connection, fertility, rejuvenation, balance, happy home

Light Blue

5th

Clear communication, balance, intellectual & intuitive insight, creativity, adapting to change

Med/Dark Blue

5th

Meditation, tranquility, peace, truth, wisdom, devotion, healing, remembering dreams

Purple

6th

Spirituality, wisdom, intuition, divination, psychic skill, protection from “psychic vampires”

Lavender

7th

Intuition, dreams

White

7th

Clarity, protection, contact with elemental beings, consecration, cleansing, breaking curses

Gray

Balance, judgment, counteracting negative forces, stopping something already in progress

Black

1st

Absorbs negative energy, protection, Earth energy, deep meditation, power of the unconscious

Brown

Earth, animals, grounding, stability, physical healing, decisiveness & concentration, finances

Gold

Solar energy, yang force, developing aura, overcoming habits & addictions, luxury , generosity

Silver

Lunar energy, yin force, working with hidden energies, introspection, confidence, intuition, gratitude


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“Xocolātl: The Magic of Chocolate” by Cathy Douglas

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Category: Miscellaneous
Written by Mimosa
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Chocolate is one of those foods that has an almost mystical, larger than life presence. Even though it’s a luxury, very few people have a take-it-or-leave-it feeling about the stuff. I’m a take-it girl, myself. So I decided to look at chocolate’s magical history, and see whether the lore of cacao is as rich as its flavor. chocolate

Chocolate originated in the tropical rainforests of Central America, where people have harvested it since a time before history. Archaeologists have found the Mayan civilization to be a chocolate-coated one, with cacao trees in the back yards of ancient houses, and remains of both beans and cocoa pulp in excavated cooking dishes. By the time of the Aztecs, cocoa beans were so highly valued that they were used for money. Ordinary citizens wouldn’t think of drinking it; it would be like shredding up hundred-dollar bills for salad greens! Only priests, honored warriors, and nobles would actually drink cocoa. Most people used the beans only for trade, or for offerings to emperors and gods. There’s even evidence that dishonest merchants tried to pass off counterfeit cocoa beans.

Originally, cacao was made into a paste, then mixed with water to make a drink. This wasn’t much like the drink we call “cocoa.” The Maya didn’t used sweetener, and to them, the idea of adults drinking milk would have been almost as foreign as text messaging. Instead, they often mixed their chocolate with vanilla, annatto, and chili peppers. The Aztecs also used with vanilla and chili peppers, and also cornmeal and black pepper.

Xocolātl is one name associated with chocolate, though there are others. (This is a topic of academic debate, and we’re definitely not going there!) However they pronounced the word, the Maya had their own glyph (picture/word) for chocolate. Artisans inscribed this glyph on ceremonial chocolate pots, alongside pictures of kings, gods and animals sipping cocoa.
What kind of magic did ancient people associate with chocolate? Healing magic, for one. Chocolate could help a person stay awake, though in the right cases it might also have a soothing effect. Both the Maya and the Aztecs associated chocolate with blood, so it was natural for them to use it to influence human energies.

Chocolate was then, and is to this day, considered an aphrodisiac. According to legend, Montezuma consumed 50 cups of chocolate per day–more if he was planning a romantic evening. How well did this work for him? Well, scientists have also turned up a brain stimulant in chocolate called phenylethylamine, which can produce emotional highs. The only problem is, you’ll get a heftier dose of it by eating pickled herring and sausage. There are 300 chemicals in chocolate, which gives scientists a lot to work with. Among them, they’ve found the ingredient theobromine has energizing and therapeutic properties. And research indicates that even the smell of chocolate produces theta waves, which help relax us. On the other side, chocolate contains caffeine and plenty of calories. Maybe that’s what helped keep Montezuma going.

Chocolate was used in ritual–as an offering, or as part of betrothal or wedding ceremonies. The ancients seem to have universally associated it with blood. They would drip the blood of sacrificial offerings onto cocoa beans, or sometimes burn the beans themselves. Blood-red colored cocoa was best for ritual, and they used annatto to give the beans a reddish tint. The Mayan god Ek Chuah was the patron of cocoa growers and merchants. Among the Aztecs, offerings of cocoa were holy to the god Quetzalcoatl, who got kicked out of paradise for giving chocolate to the human race. Before that, the gods kept it for themselves.

Later, the history of chocolate is mixed with European conquest and enslavement, as chocolate became a cash crop grown in plantations. When Cortez demanded Montezuma’s treasures, he receieved a lot of cocoa beans in with the gold he wanted. He didn’t like it much at first, but he understood the commercial potential. This is how he described it in his pitch it to people back in Spain: “The divine drink that builds up resistance and fights fatigue. A cup of this precious drink will enable a man to walk for a whole day without food.” Later on, the Catholic Church used it as a fasting beverage. Its use spread in Europe when history’s first recorded chocoholic, Queen Anne, a Spaniard by birth, married King Phillip III of Austria. As its use spread, so did its medicinal reputation; many believed chocolate would aid digestion, purify the blood, and induce sleep.

Nowadays, most cocoa beans are once again grown by hand by independent farmers in equatorial regions. Small-scale farmers tend the plants, harvest the beans, and ferment, dry and pack the crop by hand. In Mexico, chocolate is still used as an offering to ancestors during the Day of the Dead, in the form of a dish of cocoa beans or a bowl of cocoa. As far as medicinal benefits, pure cocoa has a good mixture of fats and won’t raise your cholesterol. It’s also got antioxidants and flavonoids, as well as several micronutrients–all good stuff.

Okay, so it’s still got a lot of caffeine and calories. But sometimes that pick-me-up is exactly the magic we need!


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